Poehler and the show’s writers could have chosen to make Leslie comically strident, which in turn, would make her feminist stances outsized and rife for mockery. And that would be a real drag, truth be told. Instead (thankfully), Leslie’s feminism is marbleized into the show’s narrative, making her desire to advocate for gender equality, to encourage women to support one another, and to teach girls how to empower themselves, organic. There is nothing surprising about Leslie bringing her girlfriends together on February 13th for Galentine’s Day, a day to celebrate and honor the great gal pals in your life. She and her best friend Ann (played by Rashida Jones) are equals. They show up for one another and stick to the “ovaries before brovaries” code while other characterizations of female relationships inevitably show women pitted against one another in pursuit of boys, jobs, or other women. Even the show’s male figures like the human puppy dog, Andy Dwyer (Chris Pratt) and Ron Swanson (Nick Offerman) align themselves with feminist ideals. Andy’s foray into college finds himself drawn to a Woman’s Studies class; Ron acknowledges the influence of strong women upon him and finds his romantic match in a self-reliant, smart, successful woman played, unsurprisingly, by the badass Lucy Lawless.


Just Say Knope to Feminism | Sheila Moeschen (via becauseiamawoman)


based-shenron:

Never forget



When people say ‘This is my baby,’ they don’t always mean a baby. Sometimes they mean a dog.


—A Somali student, on what has surprised her most about the United States. (via africandogontheprairie)




You know when you’re ill and you can never see the end? You’re just like, this is it. This is how I’ll be for the rest of my life.


—Grimmy struggles with having a cold (via ihavea1dbloghelp)




danradcliffs:

TV SHOWS YOU SHOULD WATCH » Friday Night Lights

"A few will never give up on you. When you go back out on the field, those are the people I want in your minds. Those are the people I want in your hearts."


CREDIT